Macao: Day 2

November 7, 2018

After a good night’s rest and room service, I quickly ate some breakfast and got ready for Day 2.

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Our first stop was at St. Paul’s, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. On our way there, we did some street photography against many colored walls. Everywhere you turned, there was a photogenic building or a cool street with patterns and eye-catching designs.

A photographer’s playground of textures, light and shadows, and colors.

After St. Paul’s, we were led to a famous alley known as “Lover’s Lane” filled with street art, pastels, and engagement shoots where the bride was wearing intricate gowns. Luckily when we made our way down there, the alley was empty.

After all this walking, it was time to eat lunch at Tou Tou Koi, a spot famous for its dimsum. Since we were pretty famished, we ordered the whole menu. I’m talking shumai, hargow, jellyfish, riblets, char siu, crispy pork, chive dumplings, egg yolk buns, and the list goes on. Excellent flavors with wrappers that were not too doughy. I definitely had the best shumai of my life there. The mushroom in the filling kept it moist and delivered umami to my mouth.

After a brief break at the hotel, we went to one of my favorite meals at Aubuerge 1601 located in an impeccably preserved heritage building in the historical St. Lazarus neighborhood.

The Portuguese menu did not disappoint. Chunks of lobster meat inside a creamy risotto, one of the best grilled octopus I’ve had, Bolinhos de Bacalhau (salty fish potato balls), succulent suckling pig with heavenly crispy skin, and tender oxtail steeped in a dark gravy that injected bold flavors to the mashed potatoes.

For my early bday celebration, everyone whipped out their iphones to record me taking down three shots of port wine, after which I was floating on cloud nine.

A seriously delicious meal that hit the spot with the best company. Another exhilarating finish to an adventurous day.


Click here for Day 1 and here for Day 3

Momosan Ramen & Sake - Morimoto in Midtown

I first met Jae Lee in late 2012 through a mutual friend while Jae was sous chef at Morimoto’s eatery called Tribeca Canvas. Before they closed a year later, I was a regular there not just because it was across the street from my office, but because I enjoyed their Japanese take on comfort food (lamb ragu buns and braised pork ribs with a side of fried rice risotto was addictingly good). Jae did a short stint at Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare before landing at Lexington Brass. My next dinner with Jae was at Zuma where he fed my friend and me copious amounts of sushi, black miso cod, and a huge tray of dessert that turned us into Violet Beauregard twins.

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